Teddy Grace

Blues, Jazz Vocals

Born: June 26, 1905, Arcadia, LA

Lived in Montgomery, AL

Died: Jan. 4, 1992

Source: Alabama Music Hall of Fame

Turn On That Red Hot Heat

Born: June 26, 1905, Arcadia, LA

 

Died: January 04, 1992, La Mirada, CA

Active: '20s, '30s, '40s

Genres: Vocal Music

Instrument: Vocals

Representative Albums: "1937-1940", "Turn on That Red Hot Heat"

Biography

A superior singer whose career was tragically cut short, most of Teddy Grace's recordings have been reissued on a Timeless CD. She became a professional singer in 1931; sang on the radio in the South; worked for Al Katz (1933), Tommy Christian (1934), and Mal Hallett (on and off during 1934-1937); and recorded for Decca during 1937-1940, using such sidemen as Bobby Hackett, Jack Teagarden, Charlie Shavers, Buster Bailey, Pee Wee Russell, and Bud Freeman. Grace became disenchanted with the music business and quit in 1940. She joined the WACs during World War II and after straining herself singing during a busy schedule of bond rallies and shows, she lost her voice. Although Teddy Grace's speaking voice eventually came back in a weakened form, she was unable to sing again and spent the rest of her life outside of music. ~ Scott Yanow, Rovi

Source: http://www.answers.com/topic/grace-plotting-tool#ixzz1CC3TFH7N

Listen: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000Y30YMW/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_3?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B000001MDI&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1S74CY3QMHZRQWKJQXRW

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MtpXGHk3UHs

 

 

 

Singer (1905-1992)

Teddy Grace sang with Mal Hallett and His Orchestra, Bob Crosby and His Orchestra, and soloed with various jazz sidemen. Her distinctive delivery as a blues singer came from listening to African-American spirituals as a child in Alabama. Grace produced a number of hits including “What’s New?” and “Turn On That Red Hot Heat (and Burn Your Blues Away)” but tired of the music business and quit in 1940. Her singing career came to a premature end when she lost her voice performing for soldiers and at bond rallies during the Second World War.-- Jeremy Wilson Courtesy of JazzStandards.com

Source: http://www.classicsonline.com/artistbio/2888.htm

 

Teddy Grace, a white woman "of privilege," as they say in the South, who sang white-boy swing and, at her best, black-girl blues, and led a life that ended in a California nursing home, where she was known by her fourth, final and sadly appropriate name - Stella Hurt.

Source: http://www.dreamtimepodcast.com/2007/11/teddy-grace-w-mal-hallett-his-orchestra.html

 

 

Teddy Grace (June 26, 1905, Arcadia, Louisiana – January 4, 1992, La Mirada, California)[1] was an American female jazz singer.

 

Grace first sang professionally in 1931. She sang on radio in the American South and worked with the bands of Al Katz (1933), Tommy Christian (1934), and Mal Hallett (1934-37). From 1937 to 1940 she recorded for Decca Records, and her sidemen on these recordings included Bobby Hackett, Jack Teagarden, Charlie Shavers, Buster Bailey, Pee Wee Russell, and Bud Freeman.

She left the music industry in 1940 and joined the Women's Army Corps a short time later, where she sang at war bond rallies and other political events. She lost her voice as a result of these activities. She was unable to speak for years and was never again able to sing.

Twenty two of the thirty sides she recorded for Decca were reissued on CD by Timeless Records in 1996.

Footnotes

^ Thedeadrockstarsclub.com - accessed July 2010

References

Scott Yanow, Teddy Grace at Allmusic

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teddy_Grace

 

 

Subscribe to Newsletter

Rick Carter Radio - All Alabama Music

Accepting submissions and adding them daily. Artists can send their songs in MP3's to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. One song per email. Graphics and song and artist info should be included of course.

This space
for rent!

Contact:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.