Avery Parrish

Born: Jan. 24, 1917 Birmingham, AL

Died: Dec. 1959

Pianist/composer with Erskine Hawkins. Wrote the classic "After Hours".

Source: Alabama Music Hall of Fame

 

 

Avery Parrish (January 24, 1917, Birmingham, Alabama - December 1, 1959) was an American jazz pianist and songwriter.

Parrish studied at the Alabama State Teachers College, where he played in the Bama State Collegians, an ensemble led by Erskine Hawkins. He remained in Hawkins's employ until 1941 and recorded with him extensively. He wrote the music to "After Hours", and a 1940 recording of the tune with Hawkins's orchestra resulted in its becoming a jazz standard.

Parrish left Hawkins in 1941 and moved to California. He was involved in a bar fight in 1942 which left him paralyzed at age 24; he was unable to play music for the rest of his life. He worked outside of music until his death in 1959 of unknown causes.

In 1979, Parrish was inducted into the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame.

Source: Avery Parrish - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

More info: Avery Parrish at All About Jazz

After Hours (Avery Parrish song) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Avery Parrish - Bhamwiki

 

Tuxedo Junction (Remastered), Erskine Hawkins and His OrchestraFrom Alabama to Harlem (1938-1940), Erskine HawkinsSwingin' In Harlem, Erskine HawkinsVintage Dance Orchestras No. 277 - EP: Tuxedo Junction, Erskine HawkinsOne Night Stand, Erskine Hawkins

Listen: Erskine Hawkins - Download Erskine Hawkins Music on iTunes

Listen: Amazon.com: After Hours: Erskine Hawkins and His Orchestra: MP3 Downloads

 

 

 

 

 

 

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